Tag Archives: melting glaciers

Ocean Circulation, Carbon Cycling During the Last Deglaciation

ubsunur hollow biosphere reserve
Ubsunur Hollow Biosphere Reserve, on the border between Mongolia and Tyva, is one of the last remnants of the mammoth steppe, Earth’s most extensive biome during the Last Glacial Maximum. Last summer, scientists met to discuss changes in ocean circulation between this glacial maximum period and the present time and how these changes are related to changes in the climate and carbon cycling. Credit: Alexander Leshcheonok, CC BY-SA 4.0

Past Global Changes (PAGES) OC3 Working Group second workshop on Ocean Circulation and Carbon Cycling during Last Deglaciation: Regional Synthesis of Carbon Isotopes Data; Corvallis, Oregon, 27–29 June 2017

December 3, 2017 — Scientists still don’t fully understand the climatic transition that took place on Earth between the Last Glacial Maximum and recent times. Even though carbon cycling and the associated rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) during this Continue reading Ocean Circulation, Carbon Cycling During the Last Deglaciation

How Earth’s Orbit Affected Ice Sheets Millions of Years Ago

temperature difference between the two interglacial periods
Temperature difference between the two interglacial periods, showing the opposite differences in surface temperatures over Greenland and Antarctica. Credit: Caroline Prescott

A new study of the late Pliocene era could help scientists predict future sea level rise

November 22, 2017 — When Earth’s atmosphere warms, the vast sheets of ice over Antarctica and Greenland melt. This melting, in addition to the thermal expansion of water, leads to rising sea levels. Although it’s clear that seas are rising at an increasing rate, Continue reading How Earth’s Orbit Affected Ice Sheets Millions of Years Ago

From the Everglades to Kilimanjaro, climate change is destroying world wonders

mount kilimanjaro - a natural wonder at risk from climate change as its glaciers shrink
Mount Kilimanjaro – a natural wonder at risk from climate change as its glaciers shrink. Photograph: khanbm52/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Number of natural world heritage sites at serious risk from global warming has doubled in three years, says the IUCN, including the Great Barrier Reef and spectacular karst caves in Europe

November 13, 2017 — From the Everglades in the US to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, climate change is destroying the many of the greatest wonders of the natural world. Continue reading From the Everglades to Kilimanjaro, climate change is destroying world wonders

How Will Climate Change Affect the United States in Decades to Come

a satellite image of an atmospheric river over the northeastern pacific
A satellite image of an atmospheric river over the northeastern Pacific on 20 February 2017, which helped California and the American West emerge from a 5-year drought. Atmospheric rivers—relatively long, narrow regions in the atmosphere—transport most of the water vapor outside of the tropics. When a large atmospheric river makes landfall, extreme precipitation—sometimes double the amount of rain that fell in the preceding 5 months—and flooding can result. The frequency and intensity of atmospheric rivers and droughts are just two realms explored in a new report that focuses on the effects of climate change across the United States. Credit: Jesse Allen, NASA Earth Observatory/VIIRS/Suomi-NPP

A new U.S. government report shows that climate is changing and that human activities will lead to many more changes. These changes will affect sea levels, drought frequency, severe precipitation, and more

November 3, 2017 — Today scientists released a new report that details how climate change is affecting weather and climate across the United States and how future changes in climate could play out across the country. Continue reading How Will Climate Change Affect the United States in Decades to Come

In an era of unwelcome climate records Hurricane Harvey won’t be the last

hurricane harvey in houston, texas
Residents are evacuated during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas. Photograph: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

From the US to India and China, human impact on the climate is likely to have made droughts and storms more severe – and the trend is only set to continue

August 30, 2017 — The 17tn US gallons of rain (roughly 26m Olympic swimming pools) dumped on Texas by Hurricane Harvey has set a new high for a tropical system in the US, but it is unlikely to Continue reading In an era of unwelcome climate records Hurricane Harvey won’t be the last

What happened next to the giant Larsen C iceberg

a68 iceberg
View of the A68 iceberg on the 30 July 2017, taken from a European Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite image. Photograph: A. Fleming, British Antarctic Survey.

Scientists have revealed exactly how the trillion-tonne A68 iceberg broke free of the Antarctic ice shelf last month – and say it has spawned smaller icebergs

August 2, 2017 — The fate of the giant iceberg that broke free from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf last month has been revealed. Continue reading What happened next to the giant Larsen C iceberg

ADB warns climate change ‘disastrous’ for Asia

asian development bank
Image by Rappler.com

‘Unabated climate change threatens to undo many of the development advancements of the last decades, not least by incurring high economic losses,’ says a report from the Asian Development Bank

MANILA, Philippines (Jul. 14, 2017) — A business-as-usual approach to climate change will be “disastrous” for Asia, undoing much of the phenomenal economic growth that has helped it make vast inroads against poverty, the Asian Development Bank said in a report released Friday, July 14. Continue reading ADB warns climate change ‘disastrous’ for Asia

Iceberg twice size of Luxembourg breaks off Antarctic ice shelf

larsen c ice shelf
NASA handout photo dated 10/11/16 showing a rift in the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, as scientists have said that an iceberg a quarter the size of Wales is poised to break off from it. Photograph: NASA/John Sonntag/PA

Satellite data confirms ‘calving’ of trillion-tonne, 5,800 sq km iceberg from the Larsen C ice shelf, dramatically altering the landscape

July 12, 2017 — A giant iceberg twice the size of Luxembourg has broken off an ice shelf on the Antarctic peninsula and is now adrift in the Weddell Sea. Continue reading Iceberg twice size of Luxembourg breaks off Antarctic ice shelf

Huge Antarctic ice block poised to snap off

larsen c
LARSEN C. This file photo released by the NASA on December 1, 2016 shows what scientists on NASA’s IceBridge mission photographed in a view of a massive rift in the Antarctic Peninsula’s Larsen C ice shelf on November 10, 2016. File photo by Maria-Jose Vinas/NASA/AFP

When it finally calves from the Larsen C ice shelf, one of the biggest icebergs in recorded history will be set adrift – some 6,600 square kilometers (2,550 square miles) in total, according to the European Space Agency (ESA)

PARIS, France (Jul. 5, 2017) —  A chunk of ice bigger than the US state of Delaware is hanging by a thread from the West Antarctic ice shelf, satellite images revealed on Wednesday, July 5. Continue reading Huge Antarctic ice block poised to snap off

US Glacier national park losing its glaciers with just 26 of 150 left

melting glacier
Meltwater forms a pool at Montana’s glacier national park, where scientists have revealed dramatic levels of shrinkage. Photograph: The Washington Post/Getty Images

Warming climate makes it ‘inevitable’ that contiguous US will lose all of its glaciers within decades, according to scientists

May 11, 2017 — It’s now “inevitable” that the contiguous United States will lose all of its glaciers within a matter of decades, according to scientists who have revealed the precipitous shrinkage of dozens of glaciers in Montana. Continue reading US Glacier national park losing its glaciers with just 26 of 150 left