Tag Archives: commonwealth scientific and industrial research organization

Australia’s shortage of climate scientists puts country at serious risk, report find

drought-affected soil
Men inspecting drought-affected soil. Farmers are among those left at serious risk by Australia’s shortage of climate scientists, a new report says. Photograph: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images

Climate science workforce needs to grow by 77 positions over the next four years, according to report prompted by CSIRO redundancies

August 2, 2017 — Australia has a critical shortage of climate scientists, leaving it at serious risk of not delivering essential climate and weather services to groups like farmers, coastal communities and international organisations, a report has found. Continue reading Australia’s shortage of climate scientists puts country at serious risk, report find

Biosecurity blitz to target red fire ants that threaten Australian way of life

red fire ant
A red fire ant found in Brisbane. The venomous ants, if established, could infest every state and territory in Australia. Photograph: Department of Primary Industries/AAP

Second-biggest biosecurity operation in nation’s history sees $411m committed to eradicating invasive species that threatens agriculture, wildlife, tourism and outdoor lifestyle

July 26, 2017 — They are one of the world’s worst invasive species, and now, more than two decades after they are believed to have arrived in Australia, the country is launching the second-biggest Continue reading Biosecurity blitz to target red fire ants that threaten Australian way of life

Extreme El Niño events more frequent even if warming limited to 1.5C – report

extreme el niño
The risk of extreme El Niño events would rise from five events per century to 10 by 2050 under a scenario that presumes warming peaks at 1.5C by that year. Photograph: Alamy

Modelling suggests Australia would face more frequent drought-inducing weather events beyond any climate stabilisation

July 25, 2017 — Extreme El Niño events that can cause crippling drought in Australia are likely to be far more frequent even if the world pulls off mission improbable and limits global warming to 1.5°C. Continue reading Extreme El Niño events more frequent even if warming limited to 1.5C – report

‘Extreme’ El Niños to double in frequency under 1.5C of warming, study says

floodwaters along the pearl and leaf rivers
Aerial view of homes submerged in floodwaters along the Pearl and Leaf Rivers after record breaking storms dumped rain across the deep south, 13/03/2016, St Tammany Parish, Louisiana. Credit: US Army Photo/Alamy Stock Photo.

The El Niño event of 2015-16 was one of the strongest on record, bringing flooding to much of South America, southern US and East Africa, and severe drought to Australia and southeast Asia

July 24, 2017 — Now a new study, published in Nature Climate Change, suggests that similar “extreme” El Niño events could become more frequent as global temperatures rise. Continue reading ‘Extreme’ El Niños to double in frequency under 1.5C of warming, study says

‘Limitless applications’: the ‘magic powder’ that could prevent future crises

drought
There is a MOF that enables the harvesting of moisture out of the sky. Photograph: kristianbell/Getty Images/RooM RF

Metal organic frameworks could solve everything from water shortages to rotting food. Now Australian scientists have found a way to commercialise it

July 6, 2017 — It sounds like a distant dystopian crisis: a world where global food and water supply chains buckle under the strain of overpopulation and climate change, before being contaminated Continue reading ‘Limitless applications’: the ‘magic powder’ that could prevent future crises

Most Australians want renewables to be primary energy source, survey finds

windfarm
A windfarm is near Burra, South Australia. A survey found 96% of respondents want Australia’s primary energy source to be renewable, with support from either storage technologies (58%) or fossil fuels (38%). Photograph: Angela Harper/AAP

Climate Institute survey points to overwhelming frustration with government’s inaction and lack of leadership on clean energy

June 27, 2017 — The vast majority of Australians want to see the country dramatically increase the use of renewable energy, a new survey has found, despite attempts by the federal government to characterise renewables as unreliable and expensive. Continue reading Most Australians want renewables to be primary energy source, survey finds

Pacific islanders bring desperate message to Australia

archipelago of kiribati
The archipelago of Kiribati is the world’s lowest-lying country, with an average height above sea level of just two metres. Photograph: Jonas Gratzer/LightRocket via Getty Images

Kiribati and other low-lying countries are under threat from climate change, and while their people would rather stay behind, they may be left with no choice

May 18, 2017 — “Like a drop of water in a bucket, on its own is small, but if there are many, many drops, soon it is overflowing.”

Erietera Aram’s water analogy is apposite. His country faces being lost under the waves of the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading Pacific islanders bring desperate message to Australia

Can more trees, carbon capture or biochar solve our CO2 problem

reforestation
Reforestation is the least controversial negative emissions technology – but a substantial amount of good quality land is needed. Photograph: Jenny Bonner/Getty Images

As CO2 levels rise, controversial techniques including carbon capture and storage, enhanced weathering and reforestation may be solutions

May 5, 2017 — In the 2015 Paris climate agreement, 195 nations committed to limit global warming to two degrees above pre-industrial levels. But some, like Eelco Rohling, professor of ocean Continue reading Can more trees, carbon capture or biochar solve our CO2 problem

Global warming scientists learn lessons from the pause that never was

global warming indicators
‘Despite all the other indicators of global warming showing business as usual, a fixation on the average temperature of the globe stuck firm.’ Photograph: Philippe Huguen/AFP/Getty Images

New study finds there never was an unexpected lull in climate change but says the science community needs to communicate better

May 4, 2017 — People don’t talk about how global warming has stopped, paused or slowed down all that much any more – three consecutive hottest years on record will tend to do that to a flaky meme. Continue reading Global warming scientists learn lessons from the pause that never was

Australia must put a price on carbon, say institutional investors

government to take concreted steps
The Investor Group on Climate Change has urged the government to take concreted steps to unlock new investment. Photograph: Hamish Blair/Getty Images

Move needed to drive orderly transition to low-emissions power sources, Investor Group on Climate Change says

March 7, 2017 — The Turnbull government needs to put a price on carbon to unlock new investment in the electricity sector and drive an orderly transition to low-emissions power sources, according to the Investor Group on Climate Change. Continue reading Australia must put a price on carbon, say institutional investors