Global ‘greening’ has slowed rise of CO2 in the atmosphere, study finds

natural vegetation absorbs about a quarter of the carbon emissions created by burning fossil fuels

Natural vegetation absorbs about a quarter of the carbon emissions created by burning fossil fuels. Photograph: Kuni Takahashi/Getty Images

Increased growth of plants fertilised by higher CO2 levels is only partly offsetting emissions and will not halt dangerous warming, scientists conclude

November 8, 2016 — A global “greening” of the planet has significantly slowed the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere since the start of the century, according to new research.  Continue reading

Surge in plant growth explains slower CO2 rise over past decade

surge in plant growth

Credit: Jasmina007/iStock/Getty Images

It’s unequivocal that human activity is raising CO2 levels in the atmosphere. But since the start of the century, the level has stopped accelerating and has taken on more of a steady rise instead

November 8, 2016 — This is the conclusion of a new study published in Nature Communications that looks at the factors controlling how plants on land “breathe” CO2, causing the upward march in atmospheric CO2 to periodically speed up and slow down.  Continue reading