Tag Archives: atmospheric rivers

How Will Climate Change Affect the United States in Decades to Come

a satellite image of an atmospheric river over the northeastern pacific
A satellite image of an atmospheric river over the northeastern Pacific on 20 February 2017, which helped California and the American West emerge from a 5-year drought. Atmospheric rivers—relatively long, narrow regions in the atmosphere—transport most of the water vapor outside of the tropics. When a large atmospheric river makes landfall, extreme precipitation—sometimes double the amount of rain that fell in the preceding 5 months—and flooding can result. The frequency and intensity of atmospheric rivers and droughts are just two realms explored in a new report that focuses on the effects of climate change across the United States. Credit: Jesse Allen, NASA Earth Observatory/VIIRS/Suomi-NPP

A new U.S. government report shows that climate is changing and that human activities will lead to many more changes. These changes will affect sea levels, drought frequency, severe precipitation, and more

November 3, 2017 — Today scientists released a new report that details how climate change is affecting weather and climate across the United States and how future changes in climate could play out across the country. Continue reading How Will Climate Change Affect the United States in Decades to Come

California Floods Linked to Atmospheric Water Vapor “Rivers”

oroville dam, california
Long, narrow bands of water vapor in the atmosphere delivered heavy rainfall that strained and damaged the spillway of northern California’s Oroville Dam in February 2017. New research investigates the relationship between floods and atmospheric rivers in California. Credit: Kelly M. Grow/California Department of Water Resources

Narrow atmospheric streams of water vapor that deliver heavy rains are more commonly associated with floods and debris flows in northern California than with flash floods in southern California

September 26, 2017 — Around the world, huge streams of water vapor known as atmospheric rivers can generate heavy rain or snow as they flow over land. Just a few atmospheric rivers, each typically more than 2,000 kilometers long and less than 1,000 kilometers Continue reading California Floods Linked to Atmospheric Water Vapor “Rivers”