Tag Archives: anthropocene

Human race just 0.01% of all life but has eradicated most other living things

cattle farm
A cattle farm in Mato Grosso, Brazil. 60% of all mammals on Earth are livestock. Photograph: Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace

Groundbreaking assessment of all life on Earth reveals humanity’s surprisingly tiny part in it as well as our disproportionate impact

May 21, 2018 — Humankind is revealed as simultaneously insignificant and utterly dominant in the grand scheme of life on Earth by a groundbreaking new assessment of all life on the planet. Continue reading Human race just 0.01% of all life but has eradicated most other living things

Underground magma triggered Earth’s worst mass extinction with greenhouse gases

mount etna
Italy’s Mount Etna, Europe’s tallest and most active volcano, spews lava as it erupts on the southern island of Sicily, Italy February 28, 2017. Photograph: Antonio Parrinello/Reuters

There are parallels between today’s and past greenhouse gas-driven climate changes

August 1, 2017 — Coincidence doesn’t prove causality, as they say, but when the same two things happen together over and over again through the vast span of geological time, there must be a causal link. Continue reading Underground magma triggered Earth’s worst mass extinction with greenhouse gases

The great climate silence: we are on the edge of the abyss but we ignore it

kids playing
‘How can we understand the miserable failure of contemporary thinking to come to grips with what now confronts us?’ Photograph: Piyal Adhikary/EPA

We continue to plan for the future as if climate scientists don’t exist. The greatest shame is the absence of a sense of tragedy

May 5, 2017 — After 200,000 years of modern humans on a 4.5 billion-year-old Earth, we have arrived at new point in history: the Anthropocene. The change has come upon us with disorienting speed. It is the kind of shift that typically takes two or three or four generations to sink in. Continue reading The great climate silence: we are on the edge of the abyss but we ignore it

Analysis: The climate papers most featured in the media in 2016

2016's top 10 climate papers for news and social media attention
2016’s top 10 climate papers for news and social media attention. CARBON BRIEF

Every year, thousands of scientific journal papers are published by researchers across the world, but only a tiny proportion make it into the pages of the newspapers

January 14, 2017 — Using Altmetric, we’ve compiled a list of the 25 most talked-about climate papers of 2016. You can see the Top 10 in our infographic above. Continue reading Analysis: The climate papers most featured in the media in 2016

Global warming policies we set today will determine the next 10,000 years

bangladesh
A child goes to school in Satkhira, Bangladesh, on Jan. 21, 2016. Bangladesh is a country that could lose much of its highly populated land to sea sea level rise. IMAGE: ZAKIR HOSSAIN CHOWDHURY/ANADOLU AGENCY/GETTY IMAGES

February 13, 2016 — The decisions made in the next couple of decades about reducing greenhouse gas emissions will determine the severity of global warming — including potentially catastrophic sea level rise — for the next 10,000 years, according to a provocative statement by prominent climate scientists.

Continue reading Global warming policies we set today will determine the next 10,000 years

Five ways we know humans have triggered a new geological epoch

carbon
Carbon in the atmosphere is one of many major marks humans will leave on the geological record. William Hong / Reuters
Is the Anthropocene real? That is, the vigorously debated concept of a new geological epoch driven by humans.

January 20, 2016 — Our environmental impact is indeed profound – there is little debate about that – but is it significant on a geological timescale, measured over millions of years? And will humans leave a Continue reading Five ways we know humans have triggered a new geological epoch

The beginning of the Anthropocene Age, Humans leave indelible mark

anthropocene
A 2013 art installation by Robin Wollston (Image via geekwire.com)
The post-industrial impacts that humans have had on the Earth and its atmosphere may pinpoint the mid-20th century as the start of a new geological epoch.

January 18, 2016 — GEOLOGISTS ARE CONVINCED that humans have left a mark upon the planet that will detectable millions of years from now.

Continue reading The beginning of the Anthropocene Age, Humans leave indelible mark

2015 a ‘tipping point’ for climate change

eiffel tower
In this file photo, two banners read ‘Stop Climate Crimes’ and ‘Debout et Determines pour le Climat’ (Raised and involved for Climate) as thousands of people demonstrate in front of the Eiffel Tower for climate change in Paris, France, December 12, 2015. Etienne Laurent/EPA
Nature, along with the usually fractious family of nations, conspired to make it a landmark year

PARIS, France (Jan. 18, 2016) — When future generations write the history of humanity’s faltering quest to repair Earth’s climate system, 2015 will have its own chapter.

Continue reading 2015 a ‘tipping point’ for climate change

Mankind’s CO2 emissions may delay next ice age

climate change
CLIMATE CHANGE. Visitors during the opening of the new educational pavilion ‘Climate, Animals, People’ in Wroclaw Zoo in Wroclaw, Poland, December 18, 2015. File Photo by Maciej Kulczynski
Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere could override other influences to make this the longest inter-ice age period in Earth history

PARIS, France — Human-driven climate change may have put the next ice age off by about 50,000 years, said scientists Thursday, January 14, highlighting our species’ ever-more dominant influence on Earth’s natural cycles.

Continue reading Mankind’s CO2 emissions may delay next ice age